The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 8: 1965-1966 by Charles M. Schulz

GENRE: Graphic Novel / Comic, Humour | PAGES: 323

My rating: ★★★★

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Peanuts, in a word, is CLASSIC. It really is.

I never tire of it. This is the first full volume I’ve read all the way through, and yet I would happily build my collection of Charles M. Schulz’s work in its entirety.

Snoopy is my personal favourite; loud, obnoxious Lucy a very close second. Honestly, though, it’s impossible not to love the whole damn bunch of ’em.

Wit, irony, and Peanuts’ shining glory of presenting— amidst the comedy—real-life issues, all combine to make a world you want to visit again, and again. The stories are clever, cute, rolling-on-floor-laughing, but mostly I find them touching.

Schulz takes all of life’s little lemons, and through the miniature ‘old souls’ that form the Peanut gang, gets us chuckling-drunk on the lemonade.

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  The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 8

 

We are now in the mid-1960s, one of Schulz’s peak periods of creativity (and one third of the way through the strip’s life!). Snoopy has become the strip’s dominant personality, and this volume marks two milestones for the character: the first of many “dogfights” with the nefarious Red Baron, and the launch of his writing career (“It was a dark and stormy night…”). Two new characters—the first two from outside the strip’s regular little neighborhood—make their bows. Roy (who befriends Charlie Brown and then Linus at summer camp) won’t have a lasting impact, but upon his return from camp he regales a friend of his with tales of the strange kids he met, and she has to go check them out for herself. Her name? “Peppermint” Patty. With an introduction by filmmaker Hal Hartley.

One for the Money by Janet Evanovich

GENRE: Humour, Romance, Suspense | PAGES: 290

My rating: ★★★

Stephanie Plum is a brilliantly ‘real’ woman. The scrapes she gets herself into however are something else entirely. It makes for an action-packed, fun-filled read. The mystery element is contemporary and intriguing, well thought out, and written even better. Each character in the story is a life force of its own—realistically flawed, sufficiently developed—and after this exciting start to the series, I’ll definitely be checking out the others, and not just for Morelli.

  One for the Money

 

Stephanie Plum is down on her luck. She’s lost her job, her car’s on the brink of repossession, and her apartment is fast becoming furniture-free. Enter Cousin Vinnie, a low-life who runs a bail-bond company. If Stephanie can bring in vice cop turned outlaw Joe Morelli, she stands to pick up $10,000. But tracking down a cop wanted for murder isn’t easy… And when Benito Ramirez, a prize-fighter with more menace than mentality, wants to be her friend Stephanie soon knows what it’s like to be pursued. Unfortunately the best person to protect her just happens to be on the run…

How to Build a Girl by Caitlin Moran

GENRE: Humour, Romance | PAGES: 357

My rating: ★★★★

How to Build a Girl is Georgia Nicholson meets Bridget Jones with lots of swearing and lots of sex. It’s funny, insightful and engaging and has only reaffirmed my crush for Caitlin Moran’s work.

 

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  How to Build a Girl

 

My name’s Johanna Morrigan. I’m fourteen, and I’ve just decided to kill myself. I don’t really want to die, of course! I just need to kill Johanna, and build a new girl. Dolly Wilde will be everything I want to be, and more! But as with all the best coming-of-age stories, it doesn’t exactly go to plan… A Number One Sunday Times bestseller in hardback and now Number One in paperback, from Caitlin Moran, the award-winning and Sunday Times bestselling author of How to Be a Woman. (Selected by Emma Watson for her feminist book club ‘Our Shared Shelf’)

Welcome To The Working Week by Paul Vlitos

GENRE: Humour | PAGES: 345

My rating: ★★★★

Welcome To The Working Week was brilliantly funny. So dry and witty, and down to earth.

The way it was written was in the form of emails in and out of Martin Sargeant’s email account, in much the same style as Holly’s Inbox, if anyone has read that. (I started it but didn’t finish, but plan to go back to it now that I’ve read this, to compare the two.)

The format of the story is clever. It relays just enough information of actual events to the reader without actually reading any of that action as it’s happening, but we do get a clear insight into the character’s themselves through their communication with one another. It works marvellously!

There’s a lighthearted little story here, with massive doses of humour. Reads like a funnier, more clever (and obviously male) version of a tech-savvy Bridget Jones, and will make you laugh out loud whilst reading it. *stifles giggles on public transport*

 

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 Welcome To The Working Week

 

‘Welcome To The Working Week’ is the debut novel by Paul Vlitos. He offers a flinchingly funny look at modern life and the friends, flirtations and foolishness that keep it running.

How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran

GENRE: Humour, Non-fiction | PAGES: 312

My rating: ★★★★★

“So here is the quick way of working out if you’re a feminist. Put your hand in your pants.

a) Do you have a vagina? and
b) Do you want to be in charge of it?

If you said ‘yes’ to both, then congratulations!
You’re a feminist.”

Moran is witty and clever and candid. Easily one of my new favourite books, How To Be a Woman is a must-read!

Read it! Read it now! NOW!

 

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  How to Be a Woman

 

Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven’t been burned as witches since 1727, life isn’t exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them? Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women’s lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother.